Digitally Speaking

Richard Simmons
November 5, 2018

Nowadays, when it comes to digital, employee expectations are at an all time high and, with the industry-wide skills gap proving a difficult problem to solve, often the greatest challenge faced by organisations is not only sourcing the right people, but keeping them.

If your employees are motivated and committed, then individual targets are more likely to be met and business objectives are more likely to be achieved. If not, then your workforce, and available skill pool, is likely to dwindle. In the current climate, attracting and subsequently retaining talent is one of the biggest dilemmas faced by businesses of all sizes.

This is why user experience should be the driving force behind any changes to your digital landscape.

‘The Workplace’- A new definition

There’s no getting away from the fact that things are changing. ‘The Workplace’ used to be similar to an engine room where any and all work was completed. Employees came in at 9am and left at 5pm each day, completing all their assigned tasks whilst staring at the same four walls.

Then along came agile technologies, empowering employees to leave the office and enabling them to work with a level of flexibility that had never been achieved before. They can work at any time and from anywhere. ‘The Workplace’ is no longer a desk in an office. It can be anything an individual would like it to be; whether that is a cafe, the family living room or a park bench. And what’s more, time constraints are a thing of the past. Of course, the dreaded deadlines are still unavoidable but working hours are no longer dictated by a lack of efficient technology.

All in all, the ability to offer some form of flexible working has become an important part of attracting your workforce. In fact, a recent report conducted by global recruitment expert Hydrogen discovered that 81% of people look for flexible working options before joining a new company. The same report also found that 88% of technology professionals consider flexible working to be more important than other benefits and 60% of those questioned would chose it over a 5% salary increase. It’s no longer optional for businesses – if you don’t invest in the technologies to support flexible working initiatives then potential, talented candidates will look elsewhere.

And flexible working doesn’t just play a role in the hiring process, agile technologies and the new workplace can also help businesses to retain talent.

If employees can work flexibly, they can better manage their work/life balance. They can choose to work longer – and at a more flexible rate – if they wish meaning that more experienced generations will be able to educate and pass on specialised skill sets to the younger, up and coming workforce. And, thanks to agile technologies, they will no longer have to be there physically to do so.

In fact, with flexible working initiatives, if employees are coming into the office it will often be because they’ve chosen to or because they would like to meet others there. As a result, ‘The Workplace’ is transformed into a social hub, where relationships are formed and maintained, rather than a space where deadlines have to be met. Better relationships with co-workers leads to happier employees who are more invested in the company culture and so less likely to leave.

Listening to the data

There are the obvious benefits associated with flexible working initiatives for employees but installing agile working technologies also enables businesses to capture informative data.

You see, in our online world, every single action generates data. Every website visited, every message sent, every document created has a record somewhere. For businesses, this data can be used to measure employee activity and ensure that any facilities and services are meeting the standards of today’s workforce.

After all, at the heart of this new digital workplace is user experience. By monitoring the data that they are able to collect via agile technologies, businesses can essentially listen to their employees needs and ensure that they’re supporting them.

And, if you can work out which environments produce the best results in your workforce then you can look to emulate this elsewhere. For example, if there is a room in the building where people prefer to meet or are able to work more productively, data will reveal this. This intel can then be used to influence and optimise the whole office space so that your business can make the most out of its environment. So agile technologies are not only changing the ‘workplace’ as a concept, they can also be used to change it physically.

The re-definition of ‘the workplace’ has opened up a whole host of opportunities for businesses and for employees alike. Empowering your workforce and granting your people an element of choice by enabling them to work how they would like to is important for both attracting and retaining talent. As is also updating physical spaces to improve employee satisfaction and – as a direct result – productivity. After all, your workforce is your most valuable asset and if you invest in them then your entire business will reap the rewards.

Category: Analytics

Richard Simmons
June 20, 2017

I have a confession to make, I love to read. Not just an occasional book on holiday or a few minutes on the brief, or often the not so brief, train journey into and out of London but all the time. Right now has never been a better time for those with a love of reading! The rise of digital media means that not only can you consume it pretty much anywhere at any time but more importantly it is making it easier for more people to share their ideas and experience.

Recently I came across a book called “Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations” by Pulitzer Prize winner Thomas L. Friedman., which I not only found fascinating to read but has also helped to shape and change the way I view many of the challenges we are facing both in business but also in our personal lives. The premise of the book is that often he would arrange to meet people for breakfast early in the morning, to do interviews or research stories but occasionally these people would be delayed. These moments, rather than being a source of frustration, became time he actually looked forward to as it allowed him to simply sit and think. And looking at the world, he believed we are living through an age of acceleration due to constant technology evolution, globalisation and climate change. He argues that these combined are the cause for much of the challenges we currently face.

The key point about this acceleration is that it is now reaching a level in which society and people are struggling to adapt. Within the technology world we talk about disruption a lot, a new business or technology arrives that can disrupt a sector or market, the competition struggles to adapt and eventually a status quo is resumed. For example Uber has undoubtedly caused a huge disruption in the world of transport, and governments are currently working through how they can better legislate for this new way of operating. The challenge will be that new legislation can take 5-10 years to agree and implement in which time Uber may well have been replaced by autonomous cars.

So what we are experiencing now is not just disruption but a sense of dislocation, the feeling that no matter how fast we try and change it is never enough. In this environment it will be the people, businesses and societies that are able to learn and adapt the fastest which will be most successful . For business we are constantly shown how being more agile in this digital world can drive efficiency, generate new business models and allow us to succeed but I feel often what is lacking is the guidance on how to get there. We have a wealth of different technology which can support a business but what is right for me? What should I invest in first? And how do I make sure that I maximise the value of that investment?

My experience with many of our customers is that they understand the challenges and also the opportunity, but simply do not have the time to think and plan. When they do have time the amount of choice can be overwhelming and actually daunting. In a small way this is the same challenge I face when looking for new books to read, I can go online but with so much to choose from how will I know what I will enjoy? The opportunity that digital media provides with more authors and contents can actually make finding and choosing something that you think is valuable much harder.

In Logicalis, we understand the business challenges that you face and discuss with you the different technology options that could support you, recommending those that can deliver the biggest value in the shortest time frame. Contact us to find out how we can help you keep up to speed with emerging technology and use it to your benefit.

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